Sample Submission

sample-shot

Properly Collecting a Plant Sample

Collect whole plants when possible. From root to stem. Samples that include whole plants are more likely to provide the information needed for Clinic staff to make a proper diagnosis.

Be sure to dig up the plant as opposed to pulling it out of the ground. Often diseased root tissue or pathogen structures associated with roots are very delicate. Pulling plants from the soil may shear diseased tissue or pathogens away, making diagnosis more difficult.

If possible collect more than one plant. Diagnosis of a plant disease often involves performing several tests on a sample. Also, including healthy plants with your diseased plant sample can help in detecting symptoms in diseased plants. Collect plants that show a range of symptoms. Providing a sample of plants showing a range of symptoms may speed the diagnosis process.

Keep collected plants as fresh as possible. Diseases on fresh plants are easier to diagnose. If there must be a delay between time of sampling and submission keep the sample cool.

It is very important to keep foliage from becoming contaminated with soil. Soil contains many microorganisms that can readily colonize dead or dying tissue and possibly interfere with our ability to recover pathogens from diseased tissue.

When submitting a sample please fill in as much information on the form as possible. The plants NameVariety, and AgeSymptoms including unusual plant size, color or shape, and severity of the disease. The Environment (weather patterns just prior to the onset of disease symptoms, soil type, amount of water that the plant has received, and the amount of sun or shade that the plants receive); Management Practices including previous crops, fertilizers and pesticides that have been used on and in the proximity of the plant sample.


Turf Sample

turf

 

Cut sections 4 to 5 inches in diameter from the edge of the affected area where healthy turf meets diseased turf. If possible before sampling take a picture of the diseased area to be included with the turf sample.
 


Submitting a Plant Sample by Mail

plant-sample

 

Plant Sample: Place the pot or roots in a plastic bag and loosely tie the top of the bag around the stem of the plant. This will keep the soil from contaminating the foliage. Place the wrapped plant in a box. Use packing material to ensure that the sample won’t shift during shipment.

seedling

 

Seedlings: Wrap them in a moist paper towel and place the seedlings and toweling between two pieces of cardboard and put into a plastic bag. Tie the bag closed. Punch several holes in the bag to allow air movement. Place the wrapped seedlings in a box. Use packing material to ensure that the sample won’t shift during shipment.

leaves

 

Leaves: Press them flat between alternate layers of moist and dry paper towels. Put leaves and toweling between two pieces of cardboard and put into a plastic bag. Tie the bag closed. Punch several holes in the bag to allow air movement. Place wrapped leaves in a box. Use packing material to ensure that the sample won’t shift during shipment.

fronds

 

Palm Fronds: Place the fronds in a plastic bag and tie the bag closed. If the palm frond is too big section the entire frond into 4-5 inch pieces. Punch several holes in the bag to allow air movement. Place the wrapped material in a box. Use packing material to ensure that the sample won’t shift during shipment.

woody

 

Woody Branches: Cut each branch into sections. Place the pieces in a plastic bag and place the wrapped material in a box. Use packing material to ensure that the sample won’t shift during shipment.

 

conk

 

Fleshy Material (ex: fruits, vegetables, and mushrooms): Wrap the material in dry newspaper. Place the newspaper wrapped specimen in a plastic bag and tie the bag closed. Punch several holes in the bag to allow air movement. Place the wrapped material in a box. Use packing material to ensure that the sample won’t shift during shipment.

turf

 

Turf Samples: Wrap turf in dry newspaper. Place turf and newspaper in a plastic bag and tie the bag closed. Punch several holes in the bag to allow air movement. Place the wrapped material in a box. Use packing material to ensure that the sample won’t shift during shipment. If possible include a picture of the disease to aid in diagnosis.

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